Historia de las revistas científicas

Shawn J. Martin

Resumen


Los académicos que investigan la historia de las revistas provienen de múltiples disciplinas y perspectivas; al igual que aquellos que han escrito sobre la historia de las profesiones y la educación superior. Principalmente los campos que investigan la historia de las revistas son: la historia de la ciencia, la historia del libro, las comunicaciones y los estudios de información. Los académicos de todos estos campos probablemente estarían de acuerdo en que el artículo de investigación es un artefacto importante que se produce a partir de las tendencias sociales más grandes de profesionalización y burocratización de las universidades. Los artículos de investigación se convirtieron en un género de escritura exclusivo para científicos profesionales. A pesar de la importancia del artículo de investigación en tantos campos diferentes de investigación científica, pocos académicos han investigado sus orígenes.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33571/revistaluciernaga.v11n22a1


Palabras clave


Royal Society; historia; revistas; ciencia; publicaciones; comunicación académica; historia de la ciencia; análisis textual.

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Referencias


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.33571/revistaluciernaga.v11n22a1

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DOI:  10.33571/revistaluciernaga